Logan W.Brody M.Garrett N.Sydney J.

Twigs


Sydney Jekielek, Brody Morgan, Logan Weaver, Garrett Neal


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1) Count the sections between bud-scale scars and determine the age of your twig. Our twig is two years old.
2) Has growth in length occurred the same rate each year?
Yes, growth occurred at the same rate each year.
3) Why? This is because each bud grows at the same rate.
4) Examine your twig and determine how many leaf scars are located at a node. There are two leaf scars located at a node.
5) Classify the leaf arrangement as opposite, alternate, or whorled. The leaf arrangement is opposite
6) Examine the twig and determine the number of nodes produced for each growing season. There are three nodes per season.
7) Is the same number of nodes produced each growing season? Yes, the same number of nodes are produced each growing season.
8) Do all the leaf scars have the same number of bundle scars and is the arrangement the same? There are different numbers of bundle scars around where the bud scars are then the other parts of the stem. The arrangement of them, however, is the same.
9) Describe the form and location of the lenticels. Lenticels are small dots all over the branch.
10) What is the function of the lenticels? Lenticels are like pores for the plant. It helps to exchange gasses.
11) Where are the largest scales? The largest scales are on the outer layer.
12) Why are the largest scales located there? The more layers that you have underneath, the larger the layers above have to be.
13) How are the scales arranged around the bud? The scales circulate around the meristematic region.
14) Is there any relationship between the arrangement of the bud scales and the arrangement of the leaf scars? No, there is no relationship between the arrangement of the bud scales and the arrangement of the leaf scars.
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How hot are Them Peppers?


Data about how hot a certain pepper is could benefit many people. If a certain restaurant wanted the hottest peppers around they would know which ones to buy. Also, many people have allergies to hot peppers so the chart could show them what’s hot and what’s not.
http://www.swivel.com/graphs/show/36183566
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One conclusion is that many people like the pure capsaicin peppers best. Our second conclusion is that nobody likes serrano or jalapeno peppers.
What supports our conclusion is that the lines and numbers are larger for the casaicin peppers than for the serrano and jalapeno peppers. The key also tells that that the longer lines represent millions more people. The recorded data may not be that accurate because it is recorded by the millions which is very broad number. The data also represents the jalapeno pepper is 0 so it doesn't really represent accurate data.

Skittles Lab


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Yeast Lab


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What is going on in this picture?
Why do we need three beakers?
What is in each of the beakers?
What are we trying to prove or that we suspecting to prove?
Why is that one yellow?
Why is that one white?
Why is that one black?
Why are they labeled A, B, C?
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A. Contains just yeast and water. There is carbon dioxide in the tubes and when it reaches the water it creates carbonic acid. The Bromothymol blue indicated that the compound is a base because it is blue.


B. Contains molasses and water. The Bromothymol blue indicated that the compound is a base or neutral. Nothing happens in this one, the molasses just sinks to the bottom.


C. Contains yeast, water and molasses. The Bromothymol blue indicated that the compound was an acidic formation. Giving of carbon dioxide from the yeast but is feeding off the molasses.

Gummy bear-ursa gummius
Salt taffy-saltus tafinia
Tootsie roll-Tutus rollus
hershey-Chocolatus cyssan
star burst-Stellaria expoldus
jaw breaker-mandilbulus crakus
jolly rancher-joyous rancheria
mint-mints stripus
butterscotch-Rannunculus sctchus
dum dum- Moronus moronus
fire ball-spherus combustus

Dichotomous Key


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Monocots and Dicots


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Brody Morgan Trees: Honey Locust-Dicot, Hornbean-Dicot
Sydney Jekieiek Trees: Paper Birch-Dicot, Larch-Monocot
Garrett Neal Trees: Cucumber Magnolia-Dicot, Norway Spruce-Monocot
Logan Weaver Trees: White Pine-Monocot, Fir-Monocot

Herbaceous plants- Carbon Dioxide in the atmosphere is essential to life on Earth and is directly responsible for the food we eat and the oxygen we breathe.

Woody plants- Woody plants are fibrous. They are usually made into wood floorings. They also have stems and larger roots reinforced with wood produced adjacent to the vascular tissues.

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Monocot stem

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Dicot stem

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Dicot leaf

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Monocot leaf.

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Dicot root.

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Monocot root.

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Alfalfa, Bean, Rye

Protists


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Daphnia

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Hydra

Euglena

Brody Morgan Trees: Honey Locust-Dicot, Hornbean-Dicot
Sydney Jekieiek Trees: Paper Birch-Dicot, Larch-Monocot
Garrett Neal Trees: Cucumber Magnolia-Dicot, Norway Spruce-Monocot
Logan Weaver Trees: White Pine-Monocot, Fir-Monocot